94th Infantry Division Historical Society Home Page, a WWII Army division


Major General Harry J. Malony Military History
94th WWII Campaign Map
Click here to keep the 94th Legacy Alive by Joining the 94th Infantry Historical Society
The Latest Updates to The 94th Photo Gallery
History of the 94th Infantry Division Association Annual Reunions
Videos about the 94th Infantry Division
2013 Presentation Video New Orleans 94th Reunion
Bart Moonen Lampaden Dig for relics 94th video Part 1
Bart Moonen Lampaden Dig for relics 94th video Part 2
Bart Moonen Lampaden Dig for relics 94th video Part 3
94th Infantry 2012 Reunion News
94th European Campaign: Jack's Story
Bill Foley WWII Vet Talks With Musersaudionew
Harry W. Price - 94th Infantry WWII
Jack Patterson, WWII veteran Part 1
Jack Patterson, WWII veteran Part 2
Jack Patterson, WWII veteran Part 3
Jack Patterson, WWII veteran Part 4
World War 2 Full Document - Patton into Germany
World War II Submarine Warfare - rare footage

94th Div flag

94th collectables

Videos about the 94th Infantry Division
GI Joe And Lillie
Lampaden March 9 1945 94th I D
James Swarts Fought For Patton
John F. Moyer M/301 interview
301st Reg destroy a German roadblock
LT Col Roger (Dodger) Guernsey - 1
LT Col Roger (Dodger) Guernsey - 2
VHP Interview Lt. Col. Roger Guernsey
Newsreel: Battle of the Bulge
Nicholas Oresko, Medal of Honor, WWII
Putting up the Flag
Secrets Of The Battle Of The Bulge
The Battle of the Bulge
The Siegfried Line in the Ardennes
William Foley: WWII experiences
Battlefield I The Battle for the Rhine

Infantrymen of 94th Division,301st Regiment destroy a German roadblock in Oberleuken,Germany during World War II
Soldiers and vehicles of United States 302nd Regiment, 94th Division in Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany
The Untold Stories of the World War II - Full length Documentary
  Secrets of World War ll - The Secrets of the Battle of the Bulge
Silver Star - Clayton Byrd WWII: Europe

Judge Arthur Lawrence Alarcon, SSGT USA, 94th ID
94th WWII War Deaths
94th Midwest Chapter
94th Infantry Division History from WWI to 2010
302nd  L Company
Chapter Meetings by Region
Point of Contact by Region
Mementoes - 94th Infantry Division
For 94th Inf Div The Attack Magazine
The 94th ID song [composed recently]

94th infantry division camp mccainClick to enlarge
94th Combat Chronicle
94th Infantry Division "Neuf-Cats" in WWII
94th Infantry Division, 301st Infantry Regiment, at Orscholz
Shootout in Vezon, France in Oct 1944 95th Division
1999 Fall European Tour
A Closer Look at Enigma Machines and their Code
    Computer Code Cracking and Cryptology
About the 94th
Anthony Cherry fought his way across Europe with the 94th
Ardennes Alsace Destruction of the Switch
Army Times
B17F Flight Log from 9/5/1943 - 2/21/1944pdf
B17F - Incredible Enemy Compassion over Nazi Germany
"Bataan Project" a High School Project
Battle for Wies, Germany
Battle of the Bulge
Battle of the Bulge Song
Books About the 94th the Infantry Division and WWII
Camp Forrest - Tullahoma Tennessee
Campaign for Liberator Status for 94th
D-Day - Battle of Normandy
D-Day Memory
Dad's War
Diaries from Men that were in German PW Camps
Everyman's War
Fact Sheet of the 94th Infantry Division
Fred Ocheltree at the Battle of the Bulge
Front line frozen in time, World War II etched in Sam Harris' memory
Fire Trucks at War
G Company of the 301 Photos
General Harry J. Malony
Hammelburg POW Camp
History of the 94fth ID 1918 - Present
Hoodlum News - 301st Infantry
Humor - A Little Humor
Humor - Indoctrination for Return to U.S.
HyperWar, a Hypertext History of WWII
In Honor of 94th American Infantry Division (Senate - October 07, 1994)
Interesting World War Two Facts About Air Warfare
Jane's Foreign Report
Jake Nash's Scrapbook
Jewish POW swapped by Germans in World War II
Jim Maggetti rifleman survived Battle of the Bulge
Kilroy was Here [origin]
Letters Home from the South Pacific 1943-1945
376th "F" Company at Ockfen, Germany 22-24 February 1945

94th Infantry Football Pilgrims
94th Infantry Division Reactivation Slide Show
94th Division makes history - Again
Military Network - Find Military Units Contacts
Mural in the Massachusetts State House in Boston
My Father's War

National Archives and Records Administrationtruck
94th DIV Force Sustainment History
Missing Veterans
National Personnel Records Center
National World War II Memorial
North Platte Canteen
On the Way: The Story of the 94th Infantry Division
One Last Mission
Peace Monument near Sinz Germany
Roland Sluder Recalls Guarding Patton in WW II
Sam Dreben-Warrior-Patriot
Selective Service: History/Recordsfield artillery
Sgt Alfred J. "Freddie" Dionne
Story of the 3rd US Army WW II
Summary of Life
T/Sgt Mike W. Buczkowski
The 36th Infantry Division Pictorial History
The 94th Infantry Division, 301st
The 94th at the Siegfried Line
Regiment, at Orscholz

The 188th Infantry Brigade
The German [Video]
The Hammelburg Raid
The Enigma Machines and their Codesoldier
The Lorraine Campaign
The List
The Loss of the USS Indianapolis
The Saar-Moselle Triangle
The Story of the 66th Infantry Division
The Third Army in World War II
Units that were attached to the 94th Inf Div
USAMHI Units-Divs
U.S. Army Divisions in World War II
U.S. Army Military History Institute
The US Army in WWII
U.S. Center for Military History
U.S. Center for Military History Help Resource
Stars & Famous People who served in the Military
Veterans Administration
Wall of Liberty Foundation
Wartime Press
What is a Vet
Wikipedia Encyclopedia - 94th Infantry Division
Winston Churchill Speeches and Radio Broadcasts
Women Come to the Front
Women Airforce Service Pilots new
WW I Training and Combat Video
World War II
World War II Aircraft Photos
World War II - How to Camouflage an Airplane Factory
World War II Medal of Honor Recipients (look for Oresko, Nicholas)
WW II : Rare Color Film : IWO JIMA [video]
World War II US Medical Research Centre
World War II Military Situation Maps
World War II Notes
World War II on the Web
World War II Oral History
World War II Timeline
Zerf, Germany, during 23-27 February 1945
301st infantry regiment
How Jewish GIs Became Slave Laborers in Nazi Concentration Camps
See also Concentration Camp Photos of Berga am Elster
Ohio World War II vet of 94th Infantry Div. family working for 'liberator' status
Signed, Limited Edition Prints of 
"The Road to Victory" 
will be available for purchase by mail Prints are 20" x  24"

the road to victory poster
Click the photo for details
94th Monument at Ft. Bragg, NC
Dedication of the 94th Monument

The Frederick R. Balch, Jr. Story
The Military Career of PFC Peter Richard Cappadona
(be patient, this may take a little while to load)
(use your keyboard up and down arrows to navigate this story)

Links to Other WWII Units
Master Index of Army Records
A Poem - The Battle Of Orsholz Woods

Point of Contact  Harry Helms   484-288-2778
Click here for 94th Infantry Division Historical Society Information
True Story of the Recovery of 19 US Marines Killed in Action on Makin Island [video]
mural in boston
Mural in the Massachusetts State House in Boston
peace monument near sinz germany
Peace Monument near Sinz Germany
see also
94th Area of Operation
January - February 1945

Battle of the Bulge
Veterans of the Battle of the Bulge
Click on Map to Enlarge

revised 5 Mar 2015
patriot award

If anyone has information
please contact person direct by Email or Phone
if available
John Clyburn, Secretary

click HERE to email us

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A Little Humor

An elderly gentleman of 83 arrived in Paris by plane. At the French Customs desk, the man took a few minutes to locate his passport in his carry-on bag. "You have been to France before, monsieur?" the customs officer asked, sarcastically. The elderly gentleman admitted he had been to France previously. "Then you should know enough to have your passport Ready." The Canadian said, "The last time I was here, I didn't have to show it." "Impossible. Canadians always have to show their passports on arrival in France!"

The Canadian senior gave the Frenchman a long hard Look. Then he quietly explained. "Well, when I came ashore on D-Day in 1944 to help liberate this country, I couldn't find any Frenchmen to show it to!"

A World War II pilot is reminiscing before school children about his days in the air force

"In 1942," he says, "the situation was really tough. The Germans had a very strong air force. I remember, " he continues, "one day I was protecting the bombers and suddenly, out of the clouds, these fokkers appeared.

(At this point, several of the children giggle.)

I looked up, and right above me was one of them. I aimed at him and shot him down. They were swarming. I immediately realized that there was another fokker behind me."

At this instant the girls in the auditorium start to giggle and boys start to laugh. The teacher stands up and says, "I think I should point out that 'Fokker' was the name of the German-Dutch aircraft company"

"That's true," says the pilot, "but these fokkers were flying Messerschmidts."

World War II Ace?
It seems that a young man volunteered for military service during World War II. He had such a high aptitude for aviation that he was sent right to Pensecola skipping boot camp.

The very first day at Pensecola he solos and is the best flier on the base. All they could do was give him his gold wings and assign him immediately to an aircraft carrier in the Pacific.

On his first day aboard he took off and single-handedly shot down 6 Japanese Zeroes. Then climbing up to 20,000 ft. he found 9 more Japanese planes and shot them all down, too.

Noting that his fuel was getting low, he descended, circled the carrier and came in for a perfect landing on the deck. He threw back the canopy, climbed out and jogged over to the captain. Saluting smartly he said, "Well sir, how did I do on my very first day?"

The captain replied, "You make one velly impoltant mistake!"

APO 001. U.S. ARMY

AG 4110.99 (DEBCA)
20 September 1944

SUBJECT : Indoctrination for Return to U.S.

TO : All Units.

A. In compliance with current policies for rotation of armed forces overseas it is directed that in order to maintain the high standard of character of the American Soldier and to prevent any dishonor to reflect on the uniform all individuals eligible for return to the U.S. under current directives will undergo an indoctrination course of demilitarisation prior to approval of his application for return.

B. The following points will be emphasized in the subject indoctrination course:-

  1. In America there is a remarkable number of beautiful girls. These young ladies have not been liberated and many are gainfully employed as stenographers, sales girls, beauty operators or welders. Contrary to current practice they should not be approached with, "How much?" A proper greeting is, "Isn't it a lovely day?" or, "Have you ever been to Chicago?" Then say, "How much?"
  2. A guest in a private home is usually awakened in the morning by a light tapping on his door, and an invitation to join the host at breakfast. It is proper to say, "I'll be there shortly." DO NOT say, "Blow it out your _____."
  3. A typical American breakfast consists of such strange foods as cantaloupes, fresh eggs, milk, ham, etc. These are highly palatable and though strange in appearance are extremely tasty. Butter, made from cream, is often served. If you wish some butter, you turn to the person nearest it and say quietly, "Please pass the butter." DO NOT say, "Throw me the godam grease."
  4. Very natural urges are apt to occur when in a crowd. If it is found necessary to defecate, one does NOT grab a shovel in one hand and paper in the other and run for the garden. At least 90% of American homes have one room called the "Bathroom," i.e. a room that, in most cases, contains a bathtub, wash basin, medicine cabinet, and a toilet. It is the latter that you will use in this case. (Instructors should make sure that all personnel understand the operation of toilet, particularly the lever or button arrangement that serves to prepare the device for reuse).
  5. In the event the helmet is retained by the individual, he will refrain from using it as a chair, wash bowl, foot bath or bathtub. All these devices are furnished in the average American Home. It is not considered good practice to squat Indian fashion in a corner in the event all chairs are occupied. The host usually will provide suitable seats.
  6. Belching or passing wind in company is strictly frowned upon. If you should forget about it, however, and belch in the presence of others, a proper remark is, "Excuse me." DO NOT say, "It must be that lousy chow we've been getting."
  7. American dinners, in most cases, consist of several items, each served in a separate dish. The common practice of mixing various items, such as corn-beef and pudding, or lima beans and peaches, to make it more palatable will be refrained from. In time the "Separate Dish" system will become enjoyable.
  8. Americans have a strange taste for stimulants. The drinks in common usage on the Continent, such as under-ripe wine, alcohol and grapefruit juice, or gasoline bitters and water (commonly known by the French as "Cognac") are not usually acceptable in civilian circles. A suitable use for such drinks is for serving one's landlord in order to break an undesirable lease.
  9. The returning soldier is apt to find often that his opinions differ from those of his civilian associates. One should call upon his reserve etiquette and correct his acquaintance with such remarks as, "I believe you have made a mistake," or, "I am afraid you are in error on that." DO NOT say, "Brother, you're really f----d up." This is considered impolite.
  10. Upon leaving a friend's home after a visit, one may find his hat misplaced. Frequently it has been placed in a closet. One should turn to one's host and say, "I don't seem to have my hat. Could you help me find it?" DO NOT say, "Don't anybody leave this room, some S.O.B. has stolen my hat."
  11. In traveling in the U.S., particularly in a strange city, it is often necessary to spend the night. Hotels are provided for this purpose and almost anyone can give directions to the nearest hotel. Here, for a small sum, you can register and be shown to a room where he can sleep for the night. The present practice of entering the nearest house, throwing the occupants into the yard and taking over the premises will cease.
  12. Whiskey, a common American drink, may be offered to the soldier on social occasions. It is considered a reflection on the uniform to snatch the bottle from the hostess and drain the bottle, cork and all. All individuals are cautioned to exercise extreme control in these circumstances.
  13. In motion picture theaters seats are provided. Helmets are not required. In is NOT considered good form to whistle every time a female over 8 and under 80 crosses the screen. If vision is impaired by the person in the seat in front, there are plenty of other seats which can be occupied. DO NOT hit him across the back of the head and say, "Move your head, jerk, I can't see a damn thing."
  14. It is not proper to go around hitting everyone of draft age in civilian clothes. He might have been released from the service for medical reasons. Ask for his credentials, and if he can't show any THEN go ahead and slug him.
  15. Upon retiring, one will often find a pair of pajamas laid out on the bed. (Pajamas, it should be explained, are two-piece garments which are donned after all clothing has been removed.) The soldier, confronted by these garments, should assume an air of familiarity and not act as though he were not used to them. A casual remark such as, "My, what a delicate shade of blue" will usually suffice. Under NO circumstances say, "How in hell do you expect me to sleep in a get-up like that?"
  16. Natural functions will continue. It may frequently be necessary to urinate. DO NOT walk behind the nearest tree or automobile you find to accomplish this. Toilets (see 2d above) are provided in all public buildings for this purpose.
  17. Beer is sometimes served in bottles. A cap remover is usually available, and it is not good form to open the bottle by the use of one's teeth.
  18. Always tip your hat before striking a lady.
  19. Air raids and enemy patrols are not encountered in America. Therefore it is not necessary to wear the helmet in church or at social gatherings, or to hold the weapon at ready, loaded and cocked, when talking to civilians in the street.
  20. Every American home and all hotels are equipped with bathing facilities. When it is desired to take a bath, it is not considered good form to find the nearest pool or stream, strip down, and indulge in a bath. This is particularly true in heavily populated areas.
  21. All individuals returning to the U.S. will make every effort to conform to the customs and habits of the regions visited, and to make themselves as inconspicuous as possible. Any actions which reflect upon the honor of the uniform will be promptly dealt with.

From the Commanding General:


If anyone has information
please contact person direct by Email or Phone
if available
John Clyburn, Secretary

click HERE to email us

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